Author Archives: Jason Willis

How to get the best results from backlit displays.

Using backlit displays – that is, a display with lighting behind the graphics – is one of the most powerful ways to add style and attention-grabbing appeal to your displays. It’s now cheaper than ever to produce high-quality, cost-effective backlit displays with powerful graphics to go with them. These developments, coupled with the boom in demand for promotional graphics, has resulted in a sharp increase in illuminated signage demand in the market. 

A number of scientific studies have proven that backlit displays draw more attention than a standard display due to the greater intensity of colour saturation and brilliance, which immediately draws the eye.

All illuminated displays are not made equal!

The importance of choosing the right hardware as a starting point is essential. For example, is this a simple display wall or something more complex, like an exhibition stand? Do you need it to be portable or will it stay in the same location? Do you or your team need to assemble it yourselves or will you get us to do it? These type of questions will be a guide as to which display is best for you.

Any budding photographer will tell you the difference in colour between different light sources, commonly called white balance. It’s important to consider your light source, as well as the lighting within the venue where your display is being used, to ensure you deliver your branding accurately. 

Key things to consider when preparing your graphics for printing.

Backlit displays and illuminated graphics are different from other forms of printed displays. What looks right on a printed poster may not look right on a backlit display, so it’s important to understand this and prepare your graphics carefully. Often with illuminated displays, you need to take a step back and look at it from a distance, taking in the whole effect. It’s only then that you can really appreciate the effect it has.

There are a number of important points to be aware of to give yourself the best results:

1. Go bold – Illuminated displays make the graphics pop when lit from behind, so when designing a graphic get your designers to think bold, strong colours. The use of darker colours such as blues, reds, blacks, and purples all have a powerful quality when lit. Lighter colours and pastels will lack the visual punch of strong colours, so go as bold as your design will allow.

2. Use contrasting colours – The use of contrast in an image makes a major impact with backlit displays, especially if it is an opposite such as white on black. The reason this is so relevant when back lighting is because of the major variation between how much light will pass through the dark colour versus the light colour. Because there is so much more light shining through the lighter colours means you’ll get an appealing contrast that looks fabulous.

3. Be prepared to see dense colours before the light goes on – When we are preparing your artwork for printing on backlit displays we are thinking about how it will look after the lights go on, not before. In order to give eye-popping vibrancy for back-lighting we use specific print profiles that will put a lot more ink down onto the graphics so as to greatly increase the colour density. Think of a piece of coloured cellophane, and how different the colour strength will be if looking at it indoors versus holding it against the sun. This extra ink density can make your graphics appear darker in colour when not illuminated, but the effect once lit can be extraordinary.

4. Be realistic about expectations when colour matching – We all know the importance of brand identity, and for many brands getting the colour right is non-negotiable. When it comes to colour matching on an illuminated display, what are you comparing the colour to? A non-illuminated display, such as a brochure or poster? Matching colours across different substrates is possible and can be requested, but be aware of how light passing through both fabric and ink can change the colour. When working with your printer it’s important they understand the difference in materials and the effect it may have.

At Displays 2 Go, we use specific colour profiles for each of the materials we print on so you get accurate colour that looks vibrant when backlit. We’ll work with you to deliver the result that is right for YOU!

Talk to us about your next backlit display project and we’ll help you with the right combination of hardware, lighting and print to give you an eye-popping result.

What does the future hold for event spaces?

Exhibitions and trade shows continue to be a great way to showcase your brand and products, and their popularity continues to grow. Why? Because having all the right companies and services in one place is still a fantastic way to explore, network and discover. But what will our exhibition venues look like in the future and what are customers demanding? 

The one certainty is change

Even with so much uncertainty in the economy one thing is clear; the evolution of exhibition and trade show venues is changing. Especially as the quest for variety, better engagement and more unique experiences grows.

Improvements and advancements in technology and construction are creating new opportunities for both exhibitors and venues. As a result, venues are investing in expanding their capacity, broadening their offering and working towards digital integration with both exhibitors and consumers. To see these advancements, simply take a look at the ICC in Sydney.

ICC Sydney

National Exhibition Centre, England

Exhibition venues all over the world are evolving into multi-faceted destinations blending conferences, exhibitions and live events in one space. Take the NEC in England, a venue that sees over 7 million people walk through its doors each year. This year they have embarked on an $8 million investment in digital displays and signage to improve the end to end customer experience. The displays inform attendees about their visit,enabling them to keep their focus on the event and get the most out of it. It’s a crucial part of the experience and one that will only improve as technology becomes more advanced.

NEC England Display and Signage

Corporate events and boutique exhibitions are increasing in popularity.

Although purpose-built conference centres still represent the bulk of exhibition venues in Australia, there are some event organisers that are hedging their bets and turning to smaller venues such as racecourses, zoos, universities and even vineyards, in the never-ending search to be different. These venues are being used in particular for corporate events and boutique exhibitions. The ease of the mobile event infrastructure has made this a viable option and we think this is something that may well catch on in Australia.

Portability is key

No longer are exhibition stands and displays cumbersome and heavy. Most displays now are made from fabric and aluminium, making them compact, lightweight and easy to assemble. This means that attending an event doesn’t have to be a logistical nightmare. It can be as simple as turning up to the venue with the stand in the back of your car! That’s why we believe that, with this portability in mind, the smaller boutique venues could really make an impact on our shores.

Displays 2 Go - Mall display

We think that the future belongs to those that plan for it and, although the economy is uncertain, the future of venues and events is accelerating around the world and Australia is no exception! Be it all encompassing venues or boutique exhibitions one thing’s clear, the exhibition industry is changing faster than ever.

If you would like to talk to us about your next event or exhibition then please get in touch with our sales team here at Displays 2 Go, or come and visit our showroom to see the stands for yourself.

Why a design brief is important.

A good design brief helps develop trust and understanding between the client and graphic designer – and serves as an essential point of reference for both parties. Above all, the brief ensures that important design issues are considered and questioned before the designer starts work.

Why write a design brief

So let’s take a moment to explore this further.

Shooting arrows in the dark.

Even if you have had a face-to-face meeting with a designer, a written design brief is still an important part of the design process. By writing down your thoughts and expectations on paper you will ensure that those thoughts have clarity and have been well considered. If you can’t write down what you want, how can a designer ever hope to capture what you’re looking for? Without a clear brief your designer is simply shooting arrows at a target in the dark. He or she might get lucky, but do you really want to pay for all the misses?

What’s the story?

No-one knows their brand and audience as well as the owner of that brand. A solid brief provides background to your brand story, delivers your hard-earned insights to the designer and ensures that the design addresses these insights. Defining your audience helps the designer deliver the right tone and messaging to ensure your message cuts through. It might seem obvious, but knowing the gender and age profile of the audience affects many of the design choices a designer might make.

That’s not to say a designer shouldn’t push the boundaries and question those insights, but at least they will have a baseline.

Why a design brief is important.

I said, you said.

Having a written brief helps to ensure that everyone is on the same page. We’ve all played Chinese whispers so a written brief helps to ensure the message stays on-track and clear. Remember, garbage in – garbage out. Take the time to write a formal and lengthy brief, and you are more likely to see an awesome final design.

There’s no I in team.

Great design often comes through collaboration. See your design brief as part of this collaboration. It’s your chance to communicate what you think and how you feel this brief might be treated and considered. It defines your expectations and then leaves it to the designer to either meet your brief or question it and offer alternatives.

Time is money.

Designers mostly charge for their time by the hour. A well-considered brief will ensure that your designer spends less time getting things wrong and more time working efficiently to deliver on your requirement. At times you might feel like writing the brief is taking way to long, but honestly… stay focused as it will pay-back in the long run.

Remember, a poorly written brief or a brief lacking in necessary detail will always mean the designer has to spend extra time on the project, and this extra time costs you money!  It is always much better to spend the time up-front getting clear about your requirements and giving the designer the information they need.

How to write a creative brief.

Much like the recipe for any good dish, a great creative brief relies on a number of key ingredients plus a few added extras to spice it up. Don’t be afraid to play around, but always be sure to remain clear, focused and include lots of detail.

Write_A_Creative_Design_Brief

Here’s our top tips on writing a great creative brief.

#1   give us the background story

Remember we might be new to this brand or project so we only know what we know. Tell us all you can so that we build up a picture of what you want, as well as get a real understanding of your project and brand.

It can be really tempting to jump straight into detailing what your design should look or feel like, but first things first. Tell us about your brand mission, who your competitors are and what you think we should all be aiming for.

Design is not a one-size-fits-all solution. You need design that is right for your business, its purpose and your customer base. Go as far as including what you love about your business or what you’re most proud of – the more you show us some of your emotion, the more we can provide you with an emotive response.

Always feel free to send us inspiration materials – no doubt you’ve seen design stuff you like and feel might resonate with your audience – send it through with your brief because great design and ideas can come from anywhere.  Browsing Google Images can be a great way to find sources of inspiration.

#2  tell us what you’re looking for

We don’t want to shoot arrows in the dark in the hopes of hitting the target. Turn on the lights and show us your target – that way we can be sure to hit the mark.

Take some time to define the scope of your project, so we know exactly what you’re after. We still might question it, but at least we have a starting point.

Now we know what you want, how about why you want it. This will give us a deeper insight into your goals and aspirations, and allows us to sense check if the ‘why’ complements the ‘what’.

Because much of our design is 3D-based, always let us know how you plan to use what we are creating. That way we’ll understand where it will be used, how it will be used and who will be using it – this impacts on weight constraints, ease-of-build requirements and material longevity.

Write a creative brief

#3   describe your target audience

This is the most crucial part of your brief and ensures we deliver something that will appeal. Remember, this isn’t about what you like – unless you’re the target audience – this is all about your target consumer. If you can’t define them accurately we may well be destined for failure. Tell us their gender, their age profile, their likes and dislikes, and their socio-economic background. All this helps the designer choose a colour palette and a design style that will appeal.

#4   detail what you expect delivered

It seems obvious, but many a design has failed due to miscommunication of deliverables. Be clear in your expectations. Is this simply a design brief, or do you require artwork, print and build once you approve the design? Once approved, what elements do you want delivered? Will you be providing all copy or do you require us to write any copy? Do you require artwork at different sizes? Do you have a brand guide that we should use?

If you are presenting concepts to a board, then let us know if you need PDFs, printed visuals or mock-ups to help you sell the design concept.

#5   be clear on timings

Deadlines are always important – we hate to miss them so be clear about what you expect and when. That way we can be sure not to disappoint. If there are key milestones in the project then let us know – perhaps a board meeting where you need to present concepts? Or perhaps a date for final approval of artwork due to print timings that impact on the project LIVE date?

So basically the more you tell us, the more we can design and build what you want. It’s imperative that you write a brief that dictates all your requirements. Only then are we able to create a design that will be outstanding and exceed expectations.

For more information please contact us at Displays2go.com.au

Can we make the exhibition industry sexy?

For hundreds of years businesses have been creating and attending exhibitions because they are one of the best ways to showcase products to consumers or the trades. Exhibitions let businesses talk to customers directly and provide an opportunity to check out what the competition is doing. Think of the World Fairs and Exhibitions of the 1800s, which started with the Crystal Palace Exhibition in London, and you get a sense of their importance.

It used to be that only larger corporations could afford to attend an exhibition but, with the development of materials and the portability of display stands, the market has opened up even more, making it feasible for small businesses to attend and make a success of an event.

trade-show-displays

A look at the exhibition industry

Over time the biggest change has been around the need to immerse the consumer in “the experience of your brand” and this is one reason we need a fresh approach in the industry. Take the theatre for a second – every good actor has an army of talent behind them, from designing and building the set, operating the AV, painting the backdrops and working the front of house. These people could get paid more in other industries but they choose to work in the theatre because they love it, it’s their passion and it gets them excited!

For most businesses these days, their exhibition stand is a mini piece of theatre. And the whole exhibition is the stage. There are some clear parallels to the theatre which should not be ignored, such as design and build, lighting and front of house, but no-one seems to be selling the sizzle! Why?

Our biggest obstacle is perception.

Truth be told, it all comes down to perception. The exhibition and display industry is simply not seen as a sexy industry to work in. It’s not seen as a single business in the same way as film, theatre and music. Even though many young people attend music events and festivals these are considered to be in the music industry not the event industry.

music_festivals

The need to get young blood into the industry.

We only have to look at how much has changed in the last decade with technology to see how it affects the industry. The new products and materials that are being introduced to the industry enable designers to really think outside the box. This gives them the opportunity to design and build a solution that not only attracts but gives consumers an experience or enables them to see something they may never have seen before.

This opportunity to build a ‘make believe world’ is not something that happens in every industry and it’s one that should be talked up and promoted. We must engage people on a stand in the same way that someone is engaged during a show or concert.

Cadbury-marvellous-creations

The exhibition industry provides so many different career paths for young people, whether it’s specialising in a particular area or learning about the industry as a whole. There are so many opportunities including designing the overall concept, the design and build, the use of technology such as VR, the consumer experience, lighting or the actual running of an exhibition. All of these areas are exciting and sexy but if we don’t make our industry more glamorous and desirable soon then we are in grave danger of being left behind.

If you are interested in learning more or pursuing a career in the event and exhibition industry, then we are always looking for good candidates. Please contact us at Displays 2 Go, we would love to have a coffee and a chat!

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Expert Help When You Need It.

Exhibiting at a show takes a lot of planning, organisation and time. But even the best laid plans can go wrong.

Imagine the scene

You’ve spent months developing and designing the perfect exhibition stand so it’s ready for exhibition season. Everything has been delivered and now all you need to do is set up the stand and start selling! But, upon installation you discover a horrible unsightly gap between the stand flooring and the carpet tiles. Oh no!  You booked a 6m x 6m space and were careful to ensure your flooring is exactly 6m x 6m too, but it still doesn’t fit!

At this point you don’t really care who’s in the wrong, you just need it fixed.

Exhibition_stand_dramas_Displays2go

Who do you call and what can you do??

As we all know, setting up a stand is time critical – you need to be ready when the first consumers walk through the door. This is where it pays to be connected to people in the know, people who can react and get the problem fixed pronto. Luckily if you purchased your stand from a reputable company, and have built a rapport with them throughout the build, then you can simply put in a call and get the situation fixed. However, if you bought all of your display gear online, it can be very difficult to know who to call and how to get it fixed before the doors open on show day.

At Displays 2 Go we pride ourselves on always being available to our clients, both prior to show day and beyond. We understand that things can go wrong and we encourage our clients to involve us in the process from start to finish – this means from initial concepts to final installation. That way we can be on-site should anything not go to plan. Although we always test each product before it leaves the factory, we do understand that some things don’t always work as originally designed and small amends may be necessary.

So next time you are planning an exhibition stand, or are looking for some help, give us a call we would love to help!

The importance of colour matching.

Colour is something we often take for granted. Whether it be the colour of the sky, the greeness of the grass, or the way colours react with each other, we all see colour in different ways. However, our eyes can be extremely sensitive to subtle variations in colour. While this might not be the case if they are across the room from each other, if items are in our field of vision at the same time, we will often notice a colour difference.

For this reason, if you are at all concerned about the colour output of your printed assets it’s important you supply your printer with a colour to match when getting them printed. Colour can vary significantly according to the material it is being printed on and the print technology being used. For example, a fabric backdrop wall may look a different colour to a demonstration table graphic wrap which in turn look different to promotional leaflets.

Using the right colour profiles.

Most graphic designers create their work on a computer using part of the Adobe Suite, whether Photoshop, InDesign or Illustrator, and use a range of different colour profiles.

It’s important to let your designer know what you intend to use the design for so they can select the right colour profile. For example, anything that is designed for on-screen use will be designed in RGB, but anything that is printed should be designed in CMYK. It is imperative that you select the right profile for the job otherwise there could be a noticeable difference between how the design looks on screen and the final printed product.

Screen Colours versus print colours

But it’s not just on screen that we see a noticeable difference, there can also be a huge difference in colour between printed products such as paper, card, fabric, boards etc. Therefore supplying your printer with a CMYK colour does not always solve the problem. Why? Well there are a few reasons:

  1. colour can look different when printed on different materials;
  2. colours can easily be different if using different printing companies;
  3. inks can be slightly different on different technologies.

How do we combat colour differences?

You will be pleased to know that there are two trusted ways to avoid all of this uncertainty. Option one is to send a swatch of sample colour for the printer to match to. Option two is to use the universal system that all printers and designers use – the Pantone Matching System (PMS).

Pantone is essentially a library of various colour swatches that can be used as fixed colour references during the design process. Almost every professional design application (e.g. Photoshop) supports the Pantone colour profile, thus making it easily accessible.

How do I choose my Pantone colour?

If you are creating a new brand then it’s recommended that you choose a Pantone colour straight away so that all the promotional material can be matched accordingly.

TIP: Try to choose a colour that has a close CMYK equivalent. That way whether you’re printing in Pantone or CMYK, your brand colour will look very similar.

Pantone and CMYK colour matching

However, if you already have your brand guidelines and they do not include a Pantone colour then we recommend getting a copy of the book and selecting a colour that closely matches your CMYK. If your book does not have CMYK references then you will have to do some colour matching by printing off your CMYK colour swatch and matching it with some swatches in the book. This may seem cumbersome at the time, but it will ensure that when you sit back and look at your exhibition stand or display you will see a level of consistency that is pleasing to the eye.

Implications of not asking for a colour match

If you do not ask your printer to colour match, they won’t!  For this reason, if you end up with a colour you don’t want and you haven’t asked for matching, don’t blame your printer!  Many inexperienced event executives will have a stressful colour-related drama early in their careers and will carry the learning from it all through their career – one experience is generally enough!

Displays 2 Go have been in the display and exhibition industry for over 20 years and understand the importance of colour matching, especially when everything is brought together at the end for an event. If you need any further information then please get in contact with one of our sales team who will be happy to help.

Getting to your event on time

There is nothing worse than being late, especially when it’s to an appointment, event or exhibition. And there is nothing more annoying than being late when it’s not your fault! We all know that delays happen but when you book a flight between two of our biggest cities you expect (and rely) on them to be on time.

Delayed Flights in Australia

However, a recent report from the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics (BITRE) has revealed that one in every five airline services between our two largest cities is running late!  Flights between Brisbane and Canberra have the dubious honour of being the worst, running late 45.8% of the time according to the report.  The report looks into on time performance over all routes operated by our major airlines and reports on the routes that are most likely to be cancelled.

Some top line facts from the report show:

Best performer for on-time arrivals and departures among major domestic airlines was Virgin Australia, followed by Qantas and Jetstar.

Best on-time performer of the regional airlines was Virgin Australia, followed by Qantas and REX.

The highest percentage of flight cancellations was from Virgin, followed by Tiger and Qantas.

The report also looks at the 66 routes flown by these airlines and has reported the most likely destinations to be on time and to be delayed.

Perth to Darwin route had the highest percentage of on time arrivals

Perth to Darwin and Darwin to Melbourne routes had the highest percentage of on time departures

Mount Isa to Brisbane route had the lowest percentage of on time arrivals

Port Macquarie to Sydney route had the lowest percentage of on time departures

Cancellations were highest on the Melbourne to Townsville route followed by Alice Springs to Darwin.

For more detailed information you can view the report at https://bitre.gov.au/publications/ongoing/airline_on_time_monthly.aspx

Not enough consumer protection

According to Fairfax news, a spokesperson for the consumer group CHOICE said that Australian airlines had been “flying below the radar” on consumer protection for years. They believe that a fixed compensation scheme similar to those in place in Europe would be a welcome idea and may improve the service levels.

The European scheme states that any passenger arriving more than 3 hours late because of an airline’s fault would receive compensation of between €250 ($400) and €600 ($964), depending on the length of the flight. Even across the ditch in NZ consumers are entitled to claim compensation if the delay is the airline’s fault. Customers can claim back what they paid for if they missed a connecting flight or even tickets to events they missed, up to 10 times the value of the airfare!

So what is being done about it in Australia?

The simple answer is nothing. Each airline has its own policy on compensation for delayed or cancelled flights and it is at their discretion whether compensation is given. CHOICE believe that given these shocking stats in the BITRE report a compensation scheme should be introduced, but airlines have said  this is not necessary. A spokeswoman for the Virgin Australia Group said the industry was highly competitive and it was “in the interests of airlines to look after customers in order to keep them coming back”.

The results speak for themselves however, so there would seem to be a lack of incentives (or disincentives) for the airlines to be on-time more consistently.

So the next time you are booking a flight, be it business or pleasure, make sure you take a quick look at who you are flying with and what city because you just might need to book an earlier flight to arrive on time!

How Virtual Reality (VR) Affects The Way We Do Trade Shows and Exhibitions

As a business exhibiting at trade shows or exhibitions, one of your key objectives is invariably to stand out and capture the attention of potential customers. However, this is becoming harder and harder to do, particularly within highly competitive industries. So how do you make your audience interested in visiting your stand and deliver content that your customers want to experience?

Virtual Reality at Exhibitions

Virtual Reality brings an experience to life

Enter Virtual Reality!

Virtual Reality (VR) allows you to create something powerful for your brand. First, it gives your audience a reason to visit your booth and second it gives your audience a reason to stay!

Let’s be honest; looped videos and handing out brochures is very much the norm and can be quite bland. VR, on the other hand, gives you the opportunity to tell your story in an immersive experience and puts your products front and centre. Whilst most businesses stick to old routines, you can use VR to engage your audience using a multi-sensory experience that very few in the exhibition space are doing!

Studies suggest that of those that have tried VR before, 81% say they tell their friends about the experience and 79% seek to try it again! Think of all the word-of-mouth marketing you can benefit from that!  Those number really are extraordinary.

3 ways to use VR at your next exhibition:

Transporting customers to a virtual showroom

Trade show space can be limited, and it can be hard for you to have activities where you can truly tell your brand story. With the use of VR you can change all this and have unlimited floor space where you can create whatever experience you want for your audience. Let’s say you sell furniture, for example. Want to transport your visitors to your store and let them see your range of styles? With VR, you can! Give your customers a walk-through of your entire showroom and let them zoom in on every detail, see your full product range and get a feel for each product, just like in real life! You’ll definitely set yourself apart from the crowd and leave a lasting impression.

Check out below how McDonald’s used VR to give customers a VR tour of what it’s like eating at McDonald’s:

Sampling Your Products

Another great way to use VR is to use it for sampling your product. This may sound strange but demonstrating, or allowing your audience to experience the taste of your products, is something that can have a lasting effect. Take Boursin, for example, who designed the Boursin Sensorium roadshow and combined VR with a bespoke 360 degree CGI film. The experience was designed to make an impact on their audience and introduce them to new flavours without losing its luxury status. The campaign was a huge success with 5,097 consumers being immersed in the VR experience and two months after the event took place an amazing 92% of those asked recalled the experience.

Hands-on Training

VR also allows you to strike while the iron’s hot and give your customers hands-on training about your product right then and there. This is the perfect scenario if you sell complicated products or medical equipment. For example, you can give prospective buyers the training they need even before they place their order. This gives customers confidence in your product and brand, and perhaps an increased level of trust and value. Something definitely worth considering.

If you’d like to consider Virtual Reality for your next trade show or are curious to know how you can get the most out of it, don’t hesitate to give us a call at 1300 240 250 or email us at sales@displays2go.com.au

What’s trending right now..?

Everyone talks about things that are ‘trending’ but what does the term actually mean?

A trend is a general direction in which something is developing or changing. It is something that people are attracted to, they resonate with and are drawn to because they find it attractive or useful.

Often the current trends in the furnishing and interior design industry are reflected in our exhibition stands, pop up shops or sampling tables. Companies will ask us to encompass these trends into our designs as a way to connect with consumers.

Here are a few highlights from one of the latest trends…

Scandinavian Look

The whole Scandi look and feel is something that we are seeing a lot of at the moment. The light-coloured timbers and wood grains, the exposed beams and the hessian mats. This look makes for a fresh, modern, stylish feel with clean lines.

Scandanavian_trends

A great example of the Scandi look and feel

The colour scheme follows some simple rules. It has to look natural – hence the use of wood – and the main colour is usually black or white. The timber used in the stand gives the display height, and the black of the furnishings draw the consumer’s eye to the products on show. The look is usually quite minimalistic so whatever product is being exhibited should be a real showcase on the stand.

Exhibition_trends

Lighting is also a fundamental part of this trend with lots of lights hanging from the beams. These tend to be made out of natural elements such as brass, wood, or simple metallic fittings. The lighting is not bright but adds a warm, cosy feel to the stand and can be used to highlight certain products on show.

The final important element in this trend is the use of greenery and plants. This not only adds some colour to the stand but continues the ‘natural’ theming and brings life to the display. You will often see plants presented in ceramic or glass pots, or used as hanging foliage to complete the natural look and feel.

Scandinavian_exhibition_trends

If you would like to know more about incorporating this trend into your next display activity, give us a call on 1300 240 250.