Category Archives: sampling

Pop-Up Shops

We have all seen them in Sydney, you have probably all be in one of them, and you may even have eaten at one of them – pop-up shops and kiosks are ‘popping’ up all over the place, and research indicates that consumers love them!

Pimms Pop-up T-pot

So what is classified as a pop-up shop?

Mobile Pop-Up Store

Mobile pop-up shops aim to reach consumers on a more personal level and leave them with a sensory experience; one they will share and talk about with friends and family. Often there will be free samples that you can either taste in-store or take away with you, or it will be more personal.

Examples: food trucks, mobile champagne bar, chic fashion boutique bus, mobile barber, mobile stores.

pop-up Book store

Pop-Up Dining Experience

These dining experiences are enticing and a fun way to try something new. Often consumers like the fact that they only have a limited window in which to experience a certain eatery. Because they are usually on a smaller scale it gives restaurateurs the chance to test menu items and interact with consumers face-to-face.

Examples: pop-up poker restaurants, fast food pop-ups, Asian fusion pop-ups, fundraising pop-ups

Interactive Pop-Up Shop

These interactive stores embrace modern marketing strategies and aim to leave a lasting impression on consumers. Whether it’s a scannable virtual shop window, a branded experiential pop-up store or a robotic coffee shop these interactive methods definitely pull in the crowds. They are set up up in high foot traffic areas like high streets, malls or major sporting events. 

Example: Pimms Pop-Up T-Pot at Wimbledon, John Lewis scannable shop window, Dyson experiential pop-up store

pop-up Kiosk  

Temporary Retail Pop-Up Shop

These temporary stores are ideal for marketing new collections, product launches, sampling or seasonal promotions such as Christmas. Ranging from physical stores, kiosk malls, or mobile bus boutiques they interact with consumers, either through their senses or using digital technology.  Often pop-up shops will have a branded social “share” area where consumers can take selfies and post it to Facebook and Instagram.

Examples: Kenzo Boutique bus, Walmart Xmas Toy store, Charity Store, Corner Pop-up shops

Pop-up boutique busBranded Pop-Up Retailer

Brands are embracing the pop-up store as a quick easy win and away to gain more exposure. They are taking every opportunity to deliver a fully branded experience no matter where you are, giving an instant shop window to increase awareness and enhance consumer engagement. More and more household brands are starting to use this type of ‘flash’ marketing. 

Examples: Nutella Creperies, Tesla’s temporary car store, festival yogurt shops

pop-up experience

Why are pop-ups so popular?

Because they are eye catching, they are new and they are usually quirky. Brands can be more creative with a temporary set up attracting consumers and delighting them with something new. People like different, and if they are interactive and engage consumers it’s a win-win for everyone.

Delivering a Pop-Up Experience

Displays 2 Go has it’s own production team working out of a production facility and warehouse in Sydney. Together, the team have many years’ of experience in producing display, exhibition and pop-up solutions.

Whether you are looking for a pop-up kiosk for your next mall activation, a vendor bike pop-up store  or a branded pop-up store with sampling stations , we have the ability to design, manage, build, deliver and install your pop-up experience.
To discuss your next pop-up experience, call Simon, Phil or Liz on 1300 240 250.

Food sampling and tasting – what factors make the difference?

When it comes to your sampling activity, what are the things you need to get right?  It’s a question you need to ask yourself when you are deciding on the details of your sampling campaign, and there are a few factors to take into consideration. Here some tips for your next campaign…

Objectives

It’s important to know what drives purchase decision making with your brand, and how your customers typically buy your product on their normal supermarket shop. If you are clear on this it becomes more obvious as to where to position your sampling station.

For instance do you need to educate people about the taste or health benefits of your product in order to generate trial? If so, then it maybe better to stand outside the store, where you have access to all the supermarket’s shoppers for the day – outside provides a wider opportunity than the aisle.  If you were in-store you would only have exposure to customers in the aisle in which you were positioned, and if a customer does not walk down that aisle then you may have lost that potential sale.

Some products could be positioned in more than one aisle – heading to the front of the store or outside means you’re not pigeon-holing your brand.

Positioning and Hardware

The position that you request from the store manager may not always be the position you get. So remember to be as specific as possible, including the amount of space you require for your stand. Your need for power will also determine your floor allocation. If you can be self sufficient and not need power your options are improved. Most sampling agencies will have a good relationship with the store manager and should be able to get a premium space for you.

Cadbury Demonstration Table - Displays 2 Go

In-store demonstration table at the end of an aisle.

Not all stores allow mobile sampling, but it’s well worth considering for a new product, as you can then roam the store and actively target your ideal purchaser rather than more passively hoping they turn down your aisle! Remember, if you are mobile sampling it’s important that you have the right sampling trays to be able to showcase your product effectively and efficiently. They must satisfy store OHS requirements as well as being easy for the sampling staff to use, and of course must look fabulous!

Conversion to purchase

The conversion-to-purchase metric is what it’s all about, sometimes!  Many companies run sampling campaigns to sell more products. But if it’s a new product then perhaps trial is the key and actual purchase less necessary in the early days.

Let’s look at a potential sales scenario for a moment:

For example if we had a 100 samples in-store and we achieve 20 product sales this means our conversion to purchase would be 20%.

Simple right? Well yes and no. This is our conversion-to-purchase, but you need to be clear that if you are based in-store you will only have access to customers that are shopping in that aisle, therefore your total sample volume will be a lot smaller than being positioned at the store entrance. When you are not near the point-of-purchase your conversion rate will be reduced.

Some figures from a recent supermarket campaign investigated both positions on different days, and the results were interesting. The outdoor sampling at the store entrance gave away 1200 samples with a conversion of 4%, achieving sales of 50, in the aisle they achieved 620 samples and a 7% conversion rate, or 43 sales. As you can see from the figures the brand achieved more new customers from being positioned at the store entrance than in the aisle on this occasion.

Measurement

We are lucky that technology allow us to really follow up on marketing campaigns, and the data we can collect from the supermarkets is fantastic. It not only enables us to collect sales data prior to sampling day but also data from two weeks after. Giving us trend data on consumer behaviour, and hopefully an increase in sales as a result of the sampling campaign. Feedback from the staff conducting the sessions can also help you understand any nuance in product trial numbers for each sampling session.

product measurement

Understand how effective your campaign has been with data.

Staff

We all know that staff can make or break a campaign, so make sure your talent understand the objectives of the campaign and are knowledgeable on the product.  Ensure they are aware of where they are sampling, and if they are mobile make sure they have product nearby to re-stock.

Damage can easily be done to brands via poor quality staff, so invest some time in mystery shopping them from time-to-time to make sure they are doing a good job. Agree terms with your sampling agency before the campaign starts. For instance, the number of no-shows acceptable throughout a campaign. Agree the proportion of ‘poor’ mystery shops before remedial action is taken – don’t leave it to chance, make sure your sampling agency has ‘skin in the game’ too.

Exhibition staff

Ensure your staff are engaging like this Shell Rep.

Investing in sampling does not need to be costly, but it is important to understand your shopper and to know where the best position is for your brand. Make sure the hardware is fit for purpose, looks good and portrays the right image. And spend the time briefing your staff – because they will make the first impression!

If you require any advice or need a demonstration table or sampling tray for your next campaign then check out our website at www.displays2go.com.au

 

Cooking carts in food markets

There is pretty much nothing Australia cannot grow or produce. Less than 10% of our retail food is imported, and two thirds of our land is given over to farming. So it’s no wonder that visiting the spectacular city food markets on the weekend has become a social event for many families and foodies.

Markets

It’s not just about the fresh produce and variety of foods – it’s also about the atmosphere, the smells, and of course the free samples.

Many stall holders will have a tasting plate on the front of their stall enticing you to try their food and produce. But for some stall-holders their product is best experienced hot or used as an ingredient within a dish. This becomes more of a challenge to offer produce to consumers if you have no cooking facilities.

At Displays 2 Go we have just designed a cooking cart for Dandenong markets in Melbourne. They wanted to introduce a fully portable kitchen that can be used on market day by different vendors.  The design we came up with is compact unit that can be wheeled out into the retail space and quickly assembled with minimal disruption. The cart has been fitted out with a gas cook top, a sink and a hygiene-grade prep space and chopping board. There is also fresh water and a grey water outlet which is completely contained within the unit. It even has an angled mirror making it easy for the audience to see what is being cooked, and it comes with a mic and speaker system for maximum impact.

Coking Cart

The cart offers vendors the ability to cook and demonstrate how to use their products. It not only helps consumers learn more about the products themselves, but it also enables vendors to engage with their customers. The ability to be able to watch someone cook and then try it fresh out of the pan is a great way to sample products. It also creates a rather surprising ‘obligation’ by some customers to make a post-sample purchase.

Sampling is still considered one of the best ways to promote sales. The introduction of the food cart into the Dandenong markets should see a positive take up and the vendors can enjoy their lift as much as the market itself.

To find out more about this cooking cart give us a call on 1300 240 250

Experiential Marketing

It still comes as a surprise to us that many people have not heard of experiential marketing.

Many get it confused with event marketing, which is understandable given experiential campaigns do tend to be event-centric and both share the same face-to-face elements. But there are times when they have nothing to do with a specific event. In fact, when they are based around an event they tend to be less dedicated to the type of event and more focused on the interaction of the specific brand.

So what is experiential marketing, and is it right for your brand?

FACT 1: 65% of brands that use it say that it positively correlates with sales

Branding experts often refer to experiential marketing as the act of “creating unique face-to-face branded experiences.” Basically you are creating an opportunity to interact with your brand in person, and giving the recipient an experience they will ideally want to remember, and more importantly talk about and share with friends.

FACT 2:  72% percent of consumers say they positively view brands that provide great experiences

It’s important to understand that experiential marketing comes in many guises; it’s not just about a brand ambassador giving out a free sample at Circular Quay, but it is about making people STOP and THINK and LOOK at what you are doing as a brand and what experience they walk away with. It is about creating a memory that perhaps comes back to mind at the point of purchase, earning the brand both ‘consideration’ and ultimately ‘purchase’ in the buying cycle. It’s also about rewarding loyalty at times, and justifying the brand’s place in the shopping basket.

Take for example John West Australia, who have just become the world’s most sustainable tuna brand by overhauling its supply chain and only sourcing tuna certified by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC). To get this message of sustainability across to consumers, John West launched a marketing campaign that gave everyone an experience. 

They introduced a new brand called Finnish Tuna in partnership with MSC and WWF. They distributed cans of Finnish Tuna to unsuspecting commuters – only for them to find that, when they opened the cans, there was nothing in them but water and a message, “Imagine a world without fish”. This experience was designed to make consumers think about their choices at supermarket shelves and the impact they can have on the environment.

FACT 3:  78% of millennials would rather spend money on a memorable experience or event than buy desirable things.

Another great promotion was by Guinness, targeting millennials with aspirations. For a few weeks, ambassadors dressed in Guinness-branded flight attendant uniforms entered bars across the U.K., where they surprised unsuspecting customers with a chance to win all kinds of prizes. To enter the promotion, bar-goers had to order a pint of Guinness and then got to shake a mobile tablet that generated a prize on screen. Prizes included simple giveaways like passport cases and key rings but one player per night would get the ultimate prize: A free trip to Dublin — via private jet, of course — with four mates.

The important thing to point out here was that Guinness did not change any of their actual products and got across the key message that held the brand up as one that doesn’t “settle for the ordinary.

FACT 4:  49% of consumers create mobile video at branded events39% of which is shared on Twitter

Although experiential marketing is about the face-to-face experience it’s still wise to have an online dialogue around the campaign. The clever brands leverage the interactions and communicate them to masses using social media. The use of branded hashtags is a good way to get people talking. We all know that if you provide consumers with a great experience they will want to share it, and with social media being at our fingertips every second of the day, what better way to get your brand out there.

Next time you have that crazy idea and need someone to help with your experiential campaign to create a bespoke portable display, create a lightweight sampling table or even a selection of vendor trays, give us a call.  We have years of experience doing exactly this, and can certainly help to make your vision come to life.

Promotional Pricing

One of the major factors in any purchasing decision is price. We all know that everyone likes to think that they got a bargain. So, in any promotion, pricing is an important part. Firstly, you need to decide what the perceived value of the item is and then what consumers will be willing to pay for it. Once you have this figure in your mind it is easier to create a promotion. Price promotions come in all shapes and sizes these days as we have to take into consideration the online shopper as well as the ‘physical’ shopper.

Promotional pricing

For instance, to encourage consumers to buy a product, you may offer:

  • Instant money off
  • Future coupons / online vouchers
  • Free product trial
  • Free shipping and delivery
  • Competitions

However, depending on the consumer group you are targeting it is often better to bundle offers to get people to purchase now and afterwards. To this end, bundling is becoming increasingly popular.  It is gaining traction as a very useful marketing tool as it enables you to target selected audiences by giving them the offerings that they will be most receptive to. This reduces the amount of time and money spent on implementing promotional programs down the line.

For example if we were promoting a new yogurt we would probably want to run a campaign that encouraged consumers to participate in a free trial.

Physical Consumer – Taste and Purchase

Displays 2 Go Demonstration Table

This could be done by having an in-store sampling team handing out free samples, perhaps accomplished by either setting up a portable demonstration table or employing one of the mobile sampling units such as a vendor tray or the click stand. The promotional talent would then be able to talk to the consumer and after the trial, offer them an instant reward of a money-off voucher to use in-store.

OR

Online Consumer – Sign up and Taste

Sampling Promotions

Offer consumers the chance to get a free sample of the product either delivered to their door or with an online voucher that can be used when they shop online or can be scanned at the checkout. They can only receive this by going onto the website and registering online. This way you get the consumer’s details and are able to market to them again in the future.

Both methods work well but the key difference is who your target audience is and what they perceive the value of the product to be. Many members of generation Y would not flinch at giving out their email address whilst other generations would prefer the ‘here and now’ approach of tasting and receiving an instant reward.

Displays 2 Go have a wealth of experience when it comes to sampling-campaigns so next time you have a new product to get out into the marketplace give the team a call and let’s see how we can help make a difference.

Office sampling

Over the last few months we’ve seen a huge spike in office sampling campaigns. Marketers have recognized this segment as a huge, untapped opportunity, with large numbers of professional people gathered in one place.

Office Sampling - Displays 2 GoThe simple reality is that marketers are all trying to find ways to cut through the media clutter, in a complex and fragmented marketplace. That means being ‘disruptive’, and it means getting your brand to pop up in unexpected places.

Of course, getting an offer for a brand on your phone just when you’re in the shopping aisle could be construed as helpful by some and intrusive by others. Getting a packet of chips just before lunch, whilst seated at your desk, could be perfect timing or it could be seen as intrusive.

Office sampling provides a number of benefits to the prospective marketer:

  • It’s easy to reach a significant number of people in a short timeframe.
  • It’s easy to get people talking about your brand, because they’re huddled around and know one another.
  • The people you’re sampling to are somewhat captive – they’re at their workplace so you don’t have to find them and stop them!
  • With the right gear, it’s possible to make quite an impact in a small space, ensuring you get noticed and remembered.

Let’s look at a real live example:

Target Market A new type of food product aimed at both males and females aged 20-45.

Opportunity We could get to this group through grocery (expensive) or through street sampling (trickier) or through office sampling. Even if we don’t get permission to go inside the office, we know the main times they enter and exit the building, and word soon gets around that you’re sampling!

Most workers these days – and especially Millenials – are time poor.  If something is going to make an impact on their busy schedule it had better be convenient and memorable.  So, going into their office space could be the perfect solution.  Even if they are not at their desk you can always leave a sample on their table for their return!

So if it’s this easy why isn’t everyone doing it?

Well there are a few things that you have to be aware of when sampling in this way.  Here are a few pitfalls to office sampling which you should be aware of.

Size and maneuverability

Offices pay a premium for floor space, so many working spaces are quite cramped, including the corridors, lifts and around cubicles.  Ensure that whatever you use to sample your product is small enough to get around the office and can be easily maneuvered without causing a scene. The last thing you want is for your sampling team to be disturbing everyone for the wrong reason!  Sampling trolleys such as the Click Stand are a perfect solution. They are on wheels, easy to move around and have multiple uses so can be used time and time again.

Displays 2 Go - Mobile unitsVolume of product

Think about what you are sampling and how much you will need for the office – no one likes  to be left out especially when you are offering them something for free. Ensure your promotional stands or your sampling trolley is able to carry the amount you require, and if your staff are walking around with sampling trays make sure there is a place that they can re-stock regularly.

Portability

It’s not always the case but many offices either have steps leading into a main foyer or are based on an upper floor, so making sure your sampling unit is portable and lightweight is key. It’s important the unit can fit in a lift, and if you are moving around the offices, that it is on an appropriate set of wheels for the environment. If you are setting up a promotional stand then it needs to be lightweight and portable for your staff to carry, and quick and easy to set up.

sampling trollySignage and branding

You need people to associate the activity with your brand, and to ensure your promotional staff stand out from everyone else in the office.  This means thinking carefully about what your staff wear and how they are going sample the product is necessary.  Are your staff going to set up a stand or are they going to be walking around the office?  Do they simply hand the samples over, or do they engage with their audience?  Whatever the decision, make sure your message is clear and can be seen from a distance.

At Displays 2 Go we have an existing range of products that are perfectly suited to office sampling, as well as constantly developing new ideas with our clients.  So talk to us about your requirements and we’ll work with you to deliver a solution that ticks all the boxes.