Author Archives: Jason Willis

Acrylic Display Cubes

Maybe it’s something that we take for granted or maybe we just don’t notice them, but acrylic display cubes are everywhere! The next time you’re out shopping take a look in shop windows, keep your eyes open at exhibition stands or in museums, all places where you can find these cubes, and notice how they are used to great effect to showcase products at their very best.

Acrylic Display Case

What is an acrylic display cube used for?

An acrylic display cube is used to promote or showcase a product. It can be used to provide added security for a display item, or simply to prevent others from touching the product on display. The cubes can be made in a size to suit you, and can be used to display objects either inside or on top.

For example, in a shop window you may want to feature some shoes. Putting these on top of a Perspex display cube and then using some spot lighting will immediately draw attention to your product.

Or you may have an item that is delicate or valuable that you need to display. An acrylic display cube can act very much like a clear box, enabling people to view the item whilst keeping it protected.

Can I get an acrylic cube in a different colour?

The cubes can be made in a colour to suit you, but the most popular style is a clear Perspex. Other colours that are popular include white, black and a mirror finish.

Materials used for acrylic display cubes

As the name suggests, acrylic display cubes are generally made from a clear acrylic or Perspex, normally around 6mm thickness. Acrylic is a versatile material that can easily be cleaned with soapy water or a microfibre cloth, giving you a premium clear finish.

If you would like to showcase your acrylic display cube with a plinth base this can be constructed with a 16mm thick timber board to provide a smooth finish with maximum strength. The plinths can be built at a size and colour to suit your requirements.

Examples of acrylic display cubes

Acrylic display cubes - displays 2 go

For further information and pricing head to our website.

Exhibition​ ​stands​ ​from​ ​around​ ​the​ ​world

In our industry we know the importance of standing out from the crowd. But it’s all too easy to blend in when it comes to large exhibition halls like the ICC Sydney. So how do you stand out amongst hundreds of different exhibitors, and how do you cut through all the traffic?

We decided to take a look around the globe to see what types of exhibition stands really stand out, show you what can be done and let you take inspiration from these companies that turn heads with their stands.

Retro​ ​Exhibition​ ​Stand

Creating that WOW factor with different materials is one way to get attention. This corrugated iron container-style stand, with its bold colours and workshop lighting, creates interest and intrigue from the outset. It makes people want to stop and look inside.

Retro Exhibition stand

Photocredit: google and Pinterest

Odlo​ ​Sportswear​ ​and​ ​Apparel

This stand has impact for two reasons. The modern structure certainly makes an impression, with its height elevation combined with the huge images, and the use of lighting really promotes the products.

The stand is cleverly designed to look like a retail shop window, creating an authentic air that people are drawn to.

Stand our exhibition stands

Photo credit: google and Pinterest

The​ ​Honest​ ​Company

The Honest Company took a creative stance when it came to delivering their exhibition stand. Being a consumer goods company that emphasises household products for ethical consumers, it made perfect sense to create a store that was open and honest with no roof or doors. The colourful flowers along with the grass effect is a clever design that gives the stand presence and an affinity with potential consumers.

The Honest Company exhibition

Photo credit: google and Pinterest

Serafini​ ​Shop​ ​Fitters

Serefini’s stand combined many different wall formations, creating its own world inside the stand.

The combination of round swinging windows made of copper, brass and wood offered insights and outlooks into their shop fitting systems, creating intrigue and drawing more people in.

Sarafini Exhibition Stand

Photo credit: google and Pinterest

MG​ ​Design​ ​-​ ​Mansion​ ​of​ ​Mystery

This stand is very unique with its open and simple lines. The contemporary view of the house automatically gets consumers attention and they are left wandering into the exhibit to see what it is all about.

Mansion of Mystery

Photo credit: google and Pinterest

From​ ​The​ ​Source

Not all stands need to be expensive but it helps if they can be creative or have a point of difference.

‘From the Source’ designed a stand around their values and beliefs, and built a stand that was created in a framework of wood – direct from the source!

The natural wood of the stand then complimented the products, and hey presto – they had a stand that was different and unique.

Exhibition structure

Photo credit: google and Pinterest

 

Ben​ ​&​ ​Jerry’s​ ​-​ ​Outdoor​ ​Shell​ ​Tent

This one is a bit left field but we wanted to include it as it is something that we are seeing in the exhibition industry more and more. The use of inflatables within exhibition stands is becoming more commonplace and once you have seen how effective it is then you will understand why.

Whether it’s a complete solution like this outdoor tent, or an inflatable counter or sofa, the ease of setup really is something to consider

inflatable stands

Photo credit: google and Pinterest

Looking at all these stands we can see that one of the main differentiating factors is creativity and being able to think outside the box. Being different and producing a stand that is outside the traditional parameters can be worth its weight in gold in attracting consumers.

At Displays 2 Go we have an experienced team of designers and are well placed to produce not only a stand that will stand the test of time but will also draw in the crowds and deliver a good return on your investment.

Knowing the Differences in Touchscreen Technology  

We all expect to have information at our fingertips these days, whether it’s on our mobile phones, our tablets or computers. Touch screens are all around us and they are becoming extremely commonplace.

It’s amazing how quickly touchscreens have come from a technological fantasy to something so widespread that it’s now considered standard. We only have to look at how much the mobile phone has advanced over the past decade to see how fast technology is advancing.

But it’s not just mobile phones that use this technology, it is all around us at ATMs, mall kiosks, ticket vending machines, even ordering your food at McDonald’s. Touch panels are a convenient and easy way to interact.

So are all touch screens the same?

The answer to this question is NO. There are three different types of touch technology, however where and how you intend to use your screen will determine which technology works best for you.

IR Touch

Infrared touch is mainly used on large digital displays as it does not require sensors directly on the glass. It uses IR (infared) emitters and receivers to create an invisible grid of light beams across the screen, basically forming a grid (x and y points) to pick up where the user’s finger is touching.

Digital Kiosks - IR Touch

This technology can only be used on a flat screen. It is highly durable and ensures the best possible image quality. Perfect for large touchscreen help kiosks, exhibition stands and trade shows.

Capacitive Touch

This type of touchscreen technology is commonly used in smartphones. It consists of an electrically charged layer that is placed on a glass panel. As the human body is also an electrical conductor, touching the surface of the screen results in a loss of charge. The loss of charge is then measured by circuits and the change in capacitance is calculated, thus determining the location.

Digital Kiosks - projected capacitive

These screens are durable and can be activated wearing gloves so perfect for the food/medical industry. They can also be used as point of sale units and vending machines. Very little pressure is required on this screen so it is good for swiping too. The screens have great optics and have good resistance to surface contaminants such as dust, oil, grease, and water droplets.

Optical Sensor

The optical sensor is perfect for turning an LED wall into a touchscreen. The optical sensor converts light rays into electronic signals. It measures the physical quantity of light and then translates it into a form that is readable by an instrument. An optical sensor is generally part of a larger system that integrates a source of light, a measuring device and the optical sensor. This is often connected to an electrical trigger.

This type of touch is often considered to be more primitive and, because the touch capability is less detailed than other forms of touch technology, it generally has software designed to suit (e.g. bigger icons).

Your Decision

No matter which type of touch screen you choose make sure it’s fit for your purpose. Many of the screens today are durable and most have excellent optical clarity so it really comes down to what you are going to use it for and where you will be using it.

Speak to one of our team today and let us help you get the right display for your next event.

Two Million Free Samples Given Away

Sampling is still a massive component in the marketing mix, and there is often no better way to get a new product to market than by giving away samples. But how do you get noticed? How do you make some noise in an already crowded marketplace?

Well if you’re Coke, you create a multi-faceted, technology led campaign. It all begins with a clever slogan – say YES to the taste you love – and then completes by asking customers to do just that in order to get a sample.

It uses technology in an engaging way to get product into hands and then uses social media to amplify the effect. It was a far-reaching, bold campaign that delivered a high volume of samples in a short time period. The costs would have been eye-watering but Coke is up against it and needs to win over a new audience.

It’s an interesting campaign for a brand that has been losing the love over the past few years. Is it a mistake to take out so much of the human element? Will the use of technology bring Coke to a new younger market? Only time will tell.

The Coca Cola No Sugar campaign was launched last month on the streets of Sydney. The campaign gave away over two million free samples by bus, panel and person!

Street Sampling

The first samples were delivered by a cool coke-branded truck travelling around Parramatta. This truck interacted with customers through social media, in particular Facebook Live, to give away the free samples.

Sampling campaigns - displays2go

Digital Billboard/Kiosk Sampling

Coke also introduced an outdoor sampling campaign giving away free products on Pitt Street – however there were no brand ambassadors in sight. The back lit interactive advertising panel was voice activated and encouraged consumers to become engaged with the brand by saying ‘YES’. To redeem a free sample consumers had to verbally say YES to the panel. Once they had done this, a sample was automatically vended directly from the refrigerated panel. In our opinion, simple and effective in delivering high sample volumes, but not much of a conversation piece.

Technological Sampling

ATL Tech Led Campaign

Understanding multi-screen viewing habits, the campaign went on to deliver additional trials, using the Shazam App to deliver product vouchers. The television advertisement prompts viewers to use the Shazam music app to download a free Coke No Sugar voucher.

Event Sampling

Coke went on to use major sporting events and ski resorts to get their product to the masses, providing multiple opportunities for consumers to interact with No Sugar Coke across a number of touch-points.

All of this in the space of a month has definitely got the product ‘out there’, and it will be interesting to see if more companies start using this combination of technology and in-person sampling when launching a new campaign.

We are not convinced by what we’ve seen so far. There was nothing new, amazing or very theatrical in this campaign – just a show of dollars. For us the biggest talking point is just how many samples Coke gave away in a short time period. But after one taste, will trialists come back for more?

Evolution of the Exhibition Industry

The exhibition industry is changing, and so are the products we use. There’s no need to organise a truck to collect your stand and then have three people ready to erect it – today’s products are much more portable and lightweight. In addition, they can usually fit in the back of a car and most people can erect a stand in just a few hours.

So what has changed, and is it really for the better?

Materials

One of the biggest changes to the industry is the design of the products and the materials we use. Many of the exhibition stands we now design are formed with an aluminium frame covered by a fabric sleeve. This creates a stand that is not only impactful, with its vibrant graphics, but is also robust and easy to set up. Demonstration tables and counters fold down flat into bags and flooring is designed to be laid time and time again.

Displays 2 Go

The risk of damaging part of the stand is drastically reduced, mainly because the fabric graphics do not chip or scratch like the old panels used to. In fact, at the end of the exhibition you can simply pop it in your washing machine and have it ready for your next trade show.  And with one giant graphic – rather than individual panels lined up together – exhibition stands simply look better.

Changing out your messaging is also an easy fix and one that is not too costly. Simply get another fabric sleeve printed and, hey presto, you have a whole new look for your stand. You can even print a different message on each side!

We’re also seeing an increase in the use of inflatable structures.The inflatable range consists of gazebo tents, furniture, counters and tubes. It is constructed with a strong PVC and then covered in a printed polyester cover. The cover can be branded with your logo or marketing message. Being inflatable means it can be erected very quickly, is highly portable and super easy to assemble. Call us direct for more information on 1300 240 250

Displays 2 Go - inflatables

Technology

Stands are utilising more and more technology. Visitors want to be engaged and amazed, and new technology products mean that visitors are indeed engaged even when staff are busy. Something as simple as an iPad stand or an integrated TV can be an effective tool and will not cost the earth. Touchscreen digital displays are another popular product on stands today. Not only do they draw visitors in, but they also enable them the ultimate freedom of discovering your products and services themselves using on-screen navigation. For many businesses, investment in a touch screen kiosk is re-paid easily with less staff on-stand, plus the screen can be re-programmed with a mix of content for other uses.Digital touchscreen Kiosk

Consumers

One of the biggest changes in the industry are the consumers themselves. No longer is it ok to just have a stand with a couple of staff members and a fish bowl to collect business cards. Consumers nowadays need to experience something, they need to be wowed if they are to remember your business. So it’s important to get all the elements right. Yes, it’s important to have a good looking stand, yes, it’s important to have technology, but what will really set you apart is being a little different.

If you need help being ‘a little different’ then give us a call. We’re a little different too! Find out how we can help. Call our team today on 1300 240 250.

Sampling techniques

When thinking of free samples we inevitably think about food and drink, because the food and beverage industries have made sampling an integral part of their marketing strategy for years. Despite how quickly our world is changing, and the technology that goes with it, the tradition of sampling still lives on albeit in a more non-traditional way.

Retail

Food sampling in grocery stores and shopping malls from a demonstration table or a vendor tray is the most recognisable form of sampling for consumers. It encourages them to taste the foods just a few feet away from the product and the cash register, thereby securing the potential for fast and easy sales.

Displays 2 Go Demonstration Table

Office

In-Office sampling has recently been recognised by marketers as a huge untapped opportunity with large numbers of professional people gathered in one place. Although there is the risk of it being intrusive, most recipients are more than happy to have a sample left on their desk!

Outdoor sampling

Experiential campaigns and roadshows are definitely a great way to make a noise in an outdoor space. The use of vendor bikes and sampling trays are a great way to move around the crowd and cover ground. Roadshows not only have a presence but also have a way of drawing in the crowds, enabling customers to sample and ‘experience’ the brand.

From the company

Although not a traditional technique, companies are finding themselves having to offer free samples to concerned customers who call up to find out what ingredients are in their products. To exude a sense of confidence and transparency most companies are happy to send out a free sample of the product in question along with other complimentary products.

Food delivery

Time is a precious commodity and grocery shopping online is becoming commonplace in much of Australia. The food delivery revolution, whether it’s from Coles or from your local egg supplier, is becoming a given in many households. With these delivery services, food companies large and small have the opportunity to get samples out by utilising this delivery channel.

Sampling via food delivery vansTechnology

Technology is all around us and some companies are utilising technology to encourage consumers to sample their products. Doritos, for example, created a ‘scannable’ chip. This chip was only included amongst the three new flavours of ‘3D Jacked’ Doritos. Once purchased, the customer scanned a physical chip with a phone and it gave access to cool 3D videos and more. This use of technology is clever as it not only ensures consumers buy your product, it is also likely that they taste the chips too.

Why sampling works

There are many options available to connect consumers with free samples, but actual sampling seems to be a solid strategy for many food companies. According to recent research by Time magazine – “In terms of reaching consumers, free samples are often much more powerful, and much cheaper than traditional advertising”. Here are a few reasons why we think sampling works.

Price

Sampling gives everyone the opportunity to taste or test something, no matter what the price point. Often the only thing standing between a consumer and a product is the price. Offering a free sample means consumers can try products that are potentially outside their budget — products they otherwise might never have tried.

Commitment

No matter what the price point, some consumers may not want to commit to a purchase straight away. By offering a free sample it gives them the chance to test it out at the risk of not liking it.

TasteDisplays 2 Go - Sampling trays

Often the best way to launch a new food product is simply through taste. Free samples break down the barrier between consumers and products, and allow them to try something they may have never tried before.

Regardless of traditional marketing like ads or packaging, consumers may not always be convinced they will like a product, even if it is a type of food they enjoy, until they taste it.

Reciprocation

We humans are funny creatures, and although a free sample generally means no strings attached, some consumers will feel obliged to purchase the product after getting something for free.

So in summary, sampling was big in the mid-20th century, and it still remains a key part of a marketing strategy. Consumers love getting things for free, so companies can capitalise on this by continuing to bring samples to the masses, whether through traditional retail or a more innovative route.

Take a look at our sampling solutions for your next event, exhibition or roadshow.

Is there room for another grocery discounter?

With Aldi and Lidl opening stores across Australia and giving the traditional grocery stores a run for their money, is there really any room for a third grocery discounter?

Kaufland - discounter

German retail company, Schwarz Group, has plans to bring the hypermart chain Kaufland to Australia.

Kaufland has seen success in Eastern Europe with more than 1,230 stores and has a strategy similar to Lidl and Aldi but sells branded products as well as its’ own discount merchandise.

While hypermarkets are not something that Australians have really witnessed before, the Kaufland model is based around a large format store stocking up to 60,000 product lines – everything from groceries to electronics – and this could be the differentiating factor that attracts consumers to ‘give it a go’.

Already experts believe that the Aldi’s and Lidl’s of this world leech off the bigger supermarkets initially and then convert those shoppers to buying their bulk shop from them, using Coles or Woolworths for the specialist items that they cannot offer.

If Kaufland has all the discounts and a wide product range, including their own ‘K-Classic’ brand, this could be exactly what consumers are looking for.

The Coles and Woolworths of this world, however, do not agree that it’s all down to price and still remain strong about differentiating themselves by the other services they provide in-store.

It will be very interesting to see what impact this ambitious Australian investment and development program for Kaufland has on the Australian grocery market and how consumers will react.

 

Follow up on leads – it’s worth it!

Never been easier

Data capture and following up on leads from an exhibition or trade show has never been easier. No longer do you need reams of paper to collect names, phone numbers and email addresses as it’s all captured on a tablet and sent straight to your database, ready for you or your sales team to follow up on. Or is it??

Lead Generation and Data Capture

Research has long suggested that the vast majority of leads generated by trade shows never receive any follow-up by company representatives. A recent study estimated that less than 70% of exhibitors have a plan in place to follow up leads after the show.

 This is crazy!

With the likes of MailChimp, Asana and other database marketing tools that can be automated to contact leads after the show, this really should be a simple task and one that can be set up weeks before the show. But so often this part of the sales process gets forgotten in the ‘whole trade show plan’ and the leads that you do generate become worthless. 

So here are a few ways you can make sure this does not happen to you:

Create a Trade Show Plan

A trade show plan does what it says on the tin. It is created for a specific show and covers everything from the layout of the exhibition stand, lighting, connectivity, devices, staffing and promotions. However, one of the most important things it should include is ROI and lead generation. Without a plan in place for what happens after the show these leads are in danger of being forgotten.

Create a Data Capture Page

A data capture page will create a new database where you can keep all your leads from the show. You could encourage visitors to leave their details by offering a reward, whether in the form of a competition or further information. If possible have a dropdown list on the data capture page that can categorise the leads into specific targeted groups. This way when you send them info after the show it will be relevant and targeted to their industry.

data Capture at an exhibition

Have a Post-Show Plan

Have a plan in place for after the show covering how and when you are going to contact these leads and who is going to do it. Ensure your follow-up plan offers a range of options for further engagement, like a free download or a demo request (don’t limit this to one option, give them a few to capture everyone’s interest). And make sure that you remind prospects of any announcements or special offers that you made at the show. Basically, make your email count, make it drive some action.

Make it Someone’s Job

If after-show contact is not a job for you then find someone who can own it and run with it. Ensure that person understands the plan and then has all the tools to make it happen. Include conversion analysis in your plan so that you can understand how many leads converted into sales and their value – sometimes this kind of info helps you negotiate with event organisers the following year.

We love warm leads

Any lead created at a show or exhibition is considered a warm lead. These are people that have visited your stand, have given you their email address and have shown an interest in your product. Contact them and make the investment you made at the exhibition give you something in return.

Make every lead count.

 

If you need help with your next exhibition stand or want to design some collateral around data capture give us a call on 1300 240 250.

 

Has the ICC been a success?

Convention and Exhibition Centre

It took 3 years to build, over 15,000 tonnes of steel and enough concrete to fill 40 Olympic-sized swimming pools.

When the $1.5 billion ICC Sydney opened its doors to the public in December 2016, it boasted an impressive array of features including three tiered theatres, 70 meeting rooms, Australia’s largest ballroom, the country’s largest exhibition space, and the biggest kitchen in the southern hemisphere.

At full capacity it can host three conventions simultaneously and comfortably hold 30,000 people across the three venues.

The convention centre is expected to not only attract more events, concerts and conventions to Sydney, but also inject billions of dollars into the NSW economy. Infrastructure Minister Andrew Constance states that “It will generate at least $5 billion in economic benefits for NSW over the next 25 years, and will employ up to 1800 people”.

With more than 400 events booked in at the time of opening, from rock concerts to international conferences, summits to sporting events, the future is looking bright for Sydney. The 2018 Sibos international banking conference, for example, is expected to attract 6000 people and generate $37.8 million for the NSW economy.

Many businesses around Sydney are already reaping the benefits from the centre. The redevelopment of Darling Harbour, which will encompass a new Sofitel hotel, retail and dining establishments and apartment complexes, is certainly putting Sydney back on the map and that can only be good for a wide range of businesses.

 

An Introduction to Branded Flooring Solutions

Whether you are planning a stand for an exhibition, a retail pop-up space or an experiential marketing campaign, it’s imperative you consider all aspects of the build. People tend to focus on the stand itself, which is understandable, but the flooring is often something that gets overlooked by inexperienced operators.

Branded Flooring - Displays 2 Go

5 Reasons why stand flooring is so important?

  1. It completes the picture. If flooring is part of your stand design it can be branded in your colours with key marketing messages or logos included. This can deliver a massive boost of visual “punch” to your exhibition space and increase visitor engagement.
  2. It gives your stand a defined sense of scale, making it stand out from the rest.
  3. It enables you to conceal electrical and data cables, making it look professional and slick.
  4. It enables you to finish off your stand by putting a stylish ramp edge around your display area.
  5. It can be used to effectively guide people around your stand, providing pathways and signage prompts.

Types of flooring to choose from

As you can imagine, there are many different options to choose from. It just depends on your requirements.

Raised Exhibition Flooring

The most popular flooring we produce is raised exhibition flooring. This can be timber or printed and is typically coated with a hard-wearing white melamine finish, which keeps it looking great and provides a safe, waterproof surface.

Timber Exhibition Flooring

Printed Carpet & Vinyl Flooring

The other types available are printed carpet flooring and printed floor vinyl. Both are highly effective, but each is appropriate for different scenarios.  Let’s take carpet for instance – no longer do you have a limited choice; today you get to design your own carpet and get a roll printed! A perfect solution to create a luxurious, welcoming feel under-foot, and great for exhibition stands, office lounges or waiting areas. Vinyl on the other hand is mainly used in sporting areas, shopping malls, showrooms and supermarkets. Floor vinyl is generally used for shorter-term promotions to get people’s attention, or as sponsorship at a sporting venue.

Exhibition stand - printed carpet Adhesive Floor Vinyl

Printed Carpet Tiles

Possibly the most versatile solution is printed carpet tiles. These tiles can make the difference between an average looking space and one of the most talked about spaces in the exhibition! The tiles give you the opportunity to create a unique, portable flooring solution that can be positioned together to create one large image. These tiles can be used time and time again at different venues and for a variety of uses.

Printed carpet tile

How easy is it to install?

It does depend on what option you decided to go with, but generally branded flooring is easy to install and highly portable. It is also modular, so you can start small and then add more pieces to it if required.

If you are looking for a solution that ticks all the boxes then come and talk to us at Displays 2 Go and we can walk you through all your options and provide you with a portable stand that will stand the test of time. Call us on 1300 240 250 or email us at sales@displays2go.com.au